BEN and JERRY’S Ice Cream

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At last, the article YOU have been waiting for! A lot of information about Ben and Jerry’s ice cream and where you can get even MORE information. Hint: try = benjerry.com.

First, and most important, here is a list of the 50 flavors you can buy in pint size containers. Well, not really. That’s too much information. No one has ever made it past two dozen flavors without tearing off (most of ) their clothes and run screaming into the night in search of a 24 hour convenience store that had B + J’s ice cream. But I will spare you the embarrassment of such an episode by giving you a tasty dozen names before I go further. Eins, zwei, drei –oops, I lapsed into my memory of high school German. Worse than an acid flashback.

I will start again: Cherry Garcia (where else did you expect me to begin), Chocolate Therapy, Chubby Hubby (My wife’s favorite. I don’t know why. But every time I stand in front of a mirror, she repeats herself.), Chunky Monkey, Cinnamon Buns, Everything but the…, Half Baked, New York Super Fudge Chunk (mUsT coNtiNuE ThE LISt)….Peanut Butter Cup, Phish Food, Triple Caramel Chunk, Chocolate Cherry Garcia (my latest flavor flav).

Here is a shorter list if you like oldies but goodies. (This is another list you can find in its entirety at their website.) B+J’s 12 “longest selling flavors” (ie, their sale began in 1996 or earlier). The Gold Medal winner = Cherry Garcia (1987); The Silver Medal winner = New York Super Fudge Chunk (1985); The Bronze Medal winner = Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough (1984).

My personal favorites: New York Super Fudge Chunk, Chunky Monkey, Cherry Garcia, Phish Food, and –my newest taste bud tingle—Chocolate Cherry Garcia. Notice any repetition?

On B+J’s website, you can take a quiz and you will find out the flavor most suited to you. My flavor is apparently the one pictured at the bottom of this article.

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Now, something that may surprise you. Some flavors have been “retired” to the “Graveyard.” They are no longer sold. Difficult though it is to believe, 33 flavors did not sell well or (and this is even harder to accept) taste very good. Here are a half dozen of the absentees: Wavy Gravy, Urban Jungle, Oh Pear, Cool Britannia, White Russian (don’t tell Lebowski), and Economic Crunch.

Periodically, there is a “free cone day.” I didn’t understand the specifics of the offer, so if You do, let me know. And why wouldn’t you pass the word: it’s free ice cream?!

 

Plus, for employees of B+J’s, there are 21 “K9 – 5ers” that accompany workers to their daily chores (i.e.,”K9 – 5ers are B+J’s version of “take your dog to work”). As a perk, that is a real benefit.

I will end with a question. I need your assistance. Does anyone know where I can get Chocolate Cherry Garcia? I don’t have to go to the Vermont factory, do I? None is available where I live and it is one of three (3) necessities that make my life worthwhile: my wife (the beautiful and empathic) Donna, our current dog (the energetic and affectionate, Luna aka Luna Balloona aka Bella Luna) –half pit, half pointer, and, yes (isn’t it obvious), my 5 Favs of Ben and Jerry’s. If you cannot help me, my only recourse is to toss a bottle with a note inside into the Atlantic Ocean. Please help, and Thanks.

ICmyflav

 

 

 

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About rcarmean

Two things... First, why have I decided to establish this blog? I like to put essays together. I research an idea or topic looking for information, statistics, stories, quotes, pictures, etc. I enjoy the process and seeing a finished product. I’m told that as I get older, new activities can help maintain energy and keep my brain alert. In other words, I am not doing this for money or fame. Second, regarding the gentleman in the collage of pictures above...it's not me. Those are photos of Christy Mathewson. Why him? When I was young, my primary activity was being sick. It took up much of my time. Eczema (a case so bad I was written up in a medical journal showing doctors what their patients COULD look like), asthma, and allergies. You know allergies: don’t eat this, don’t wear that, and, for Heaven’s sake, don’t touch any of these things (eg, dogs, cats, horses --I only saw horses in cowboy movies and TV shows, dust, swimming pools, my brother --OK, that’s an exaggeration, Rick was a fine brother). In my spare time between doctors' appointments, pills, and ointments, baseball kept me sane. In the 1940s and 1950s, when I grew up, pro footballI and basketball had not yet become extremely popular. Baseball truly was “the national pastime.” I listened to games on the radio (remember it? TV without the picture). I read magazines, books, and newspaper accounts of games. I collected baseball cards. I learned about the game’s history, as well as present. The same with its stars. One man stood out: Christy Mathewson. He was a great pitcher for the New York Giants in the early 20th century. But there was much more to him. At a time when professional athletes made little money (yes, there was such a time) and ball players were considered on the same level as actors, artists, and prostitutes, Mathewson stood out. One of his nicknames was: “The Christian Gentleman.” Most men is baseball drank, smoked, cursed, and fought —with other players, umpires, and fans. The fights were physical, not just verbal. Mathewson did none of these things. But he earned the respect of other players who did them all. Even Ty Cobb and John McGraw. There’s more. He was a college graduate (Bucknell University) when most men were lucky to have a high school diploma. He played other sports, including pro football which you wouldn’t recognize. He was handsome. He played in New York City, then as now, the largest city in the country. Excellence and popularity there meant fame and money. He dressed well. Today, his commercials would rival LeBron’s. And, finally, a hero’s life must have tragedy. After his playing career ended, WWI arrived. He suffered from influenza and was exposed to mustard gas. Chemical warfare. His lungs were damaged and he required treatment for the rest of his life. (Like my Grandfather who also fought in The Great War.) He died in 1925. He was 45 years old. I have his picture here because you need to know more about him than me. He was what an athlete could be. Players like him and their accomplishments got me through a sickly, painful childhood and can still sustain me in difficult times. *****
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